Walk & Bike

Why Walk?

In communities around the country, there is a growing recognition of the benefits of providing options for walking – options to walk more often, to more places, in a safe environment. The benefits of walking–whether for recreation or simply for moving from one place to another–can be expressed in terms of improved environmental and personal health, reduced traffic congestion, enhanced quality of life, economic rewards, as well as others. This section provides an overview of why it is important to walk of what the city is doing to make it easier and safer to walk more places, more often. It looks at barriers people face when making the decision to walk and how to overcome them. It also provides tips for walking safely and for increasing levels of walking as well as links to help you plan a walking trip, starting today.

Why Bicycle?

In communities across the world, there is a growing need and responsibility to provide options that give people the opportunity to bike—to bike more often, to bike to more places, and to feel safe while doing so. The benefits of riding a bicycle, whether for utilitarian or recreational purposes, can be expressed in terms of improved environmental and personal health, reduced traffic congestion, enhanced quality of life, economic rewards, as well as others.

The positive consequences of biking as a healthy mode of transportation, or as a purely recreational activity, span across many aspects of our lives. They can be expressed in terms of the health of the environment (and resulting health of all living things), as well as the health of individuals who are more physically active. A transportation system that is conducive to bicycling can reap many benefits in terms of reduced traffic congestion and improved quality of life. Economic rewards both to the individual and to society are also realized through reduced health care costs and reduced dependency on auto ownership, and the resulting insurance and maintenance costs. There are also other economic benefits of bicycling that are more difficult to measure, such as the increased economic vitality of communities that have emphasized bicycle mobility. Finally, bikeable communities create a more equitable society that provides transportation choice for all citizens.


Excerpts sourced from the Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center.